Forest Bathing (Shinrin-Yoku) Forest Medicine – Benefits of breathing clean air

Benefits of Forest Bathing (Shinrin-Yoku) – Forest Medicine or Forest Therapy

Forest bathing, or as it is known in Japanese, shinrin-yoku, is a breathing clean air practice with therapeutic properties.

Researchers have analyzed the potential benefits of forests at a therapeutic level and have found that, indeed, people suffering from certain diseases have improved physically and physiologically.

To take a bath of therapeutic forest means to enter into contact with mature forests, with a very little intervention of man, where nature is in its maximum development.

 

Health benefits of Forest bathing

Lowers blood pressure

Improving the cognitive system

Increases anti-cancer proteins

Strengthens immune system

Lowers adrenaline

Forest Bathing (Shinrin-Yoku) Forest Medicine - Benefits of breathing clean air

Physical benefits of Forest bathing

The stress hormones are reduced by reducing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and activating the parasympathetic nervous system, which allows us a greater recovery, well-being, and relaxation.

At the same time, cardiovascular actions are produced, because some substances related to arterial hypertension, such as endothelin and cytosine, are also modified.

 

Psychological benefits of Forest bathing

Forest bath it promotes lower concentrations of cortisol, decrease pulse rate, blood pressure, increase well-being, tranquility and also vigor. Benefits are also seen in people with psychological disorders, such as autism.

Older trees emitted phytonutrients that are plant-generated substances that have been shown to be effective in cancer prevention.

In countries like Japan Forest medicine it is very integrated into the public, also Japan researchers suggest that visiting the forests has a preventive effect on the onset and progression of cancer.

The Meditative walking through the forest has significant health effects. For this reason, Oriental doctors also recommend forest baths to patients with this disease, as a complement to other therapies.

resources: forest-therapy.net     natureandforesttherapy.org   shinrin-yoku.org

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